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Big Timber Island

Several years ago, a small, but distinctive land parcel on the Chippewa Flowage was listed for sale by a private owner.  Numerous concerns were raised over the possible development of the island, even though it’s size was just under l0 acres of land.  However, with over 2000 feet of shoreline, many people were concerned that the beauty of the Chippewa Flowage would be permanently marred by the development of this island.

The acquisition of Moonshine Island was also a collaborative undertaking between the DNR, CWRLT, Chippewa Flowage Area Property Owners Association and the Lac Courte Oreilles Tribe, and the Trust for Public Land. In 2007, the Lac Courte Oreilles Tribe purchased Moonshine Island and manages it in a conservation ethic, preserving the shoreline and habitat and preventing development. Due to the vision and stewardship or countless people and organizations, 90% of the shoreline and nearly all of the islands of the Chippewa Flowage are undeveloped and will remain so.

A combined effort of the Chippewa Flowage Area Property Owners Association (CFAPOA) and CWRLT was initiated to publicly raise the $50,000 needed to purchase the Big Timber Island property to protect the pristine land from development and maintain it’s undisturbed beauty.

Many people contributed time and money for fund-raising to the Chippewa Islands Project. Thanks to the effort of those people, including the CFAPOA, the Lac Court Oreilles Band of Ojibwe, the Wisconsin DNR, and CWRLT, on January 27, 2004 the Wisconsin Natural Resources Board unanimously approved the acquisition of the privately owned parcel on Big Timber Island and on February 4, 2004 Governor Jim Doyle signed the purchase agreement.  Big Timber is now protected from further development and is available for daytime public use.

Thanks to the vision and stewardship of people in past and present, 90% of the shoreline and nearly all of the islands on the Chippewa Flowage are undeveloped and will stay that way for the benefit of today’s, as well as tomorrow’s, generations.

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